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Skillet - Burn It Down


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Cast iron skillets are an incredible tool to have in the kitchen when you're cooking almost anything. However, they also take a lot more care than other frying pots or pans, so knowing how to clean them properly is a key part of owning one. By knowing a few easy ways to clean off burnt food, as well as how to restore and season your skillet when nothing else works, you can get your cast iron looking like new.


You can remove most burnt food by soaking the pan in water. If that doesn't work, boil water in the pan while pushing at the burnt food with a wooden spoon. If the food still isn't coming off, you can use a metal scouring pad to scrape the food. Always re-season your pan with olive oil before putting it away.


Well it's over, it's over, it's overI won't be pushed aroundMove over, move over, move overGet back or just get outSet this plane up in flamesIt's over, it's over, it's overIt's time to burn it down


This one goes to the castawaysWho break their backs slaving every dayAll these things I can do withoutGotta burn it down, burn it downBurn it down, burn it downBurn it down, burn it downBurn it down, burn it down


This one goes to the castawaysWho break their backs slaving every dayAll these things I can do withoutGotta burn it down, burn it downBurn it down, burn it downBurn it down, burn it down


Technically, you can use any spatula (and any tool) on a cast-iron skillet. However, metal spatulas provide the best results, especially when cooking delicate food such as eggs. Delicate food? Sturdy spatula.


Cast iron is economical, versatile, and nearly indestructible. With some easy care and maintenance in cleaning and use, your skillet will last a lifetime so you can pass it along as a keepsake to the future generation of cooks in your family.


I like the info in the article. I would not use the soap at all though. Stuff stuck to the skillet will always come off if you put a little water in it and bring it to a boil for a few minutes or just let it soak. Then I take the coarse scrubbing rag and it comes right off.


I have a #8 Griswold, nickel plated cast iron skillet. The inside of the pan has swirl marks from cleaning it with kosher salt and a chain-link cleaning pad. I have also noticed some pitting on the surface. Is there any way to repair these issues, without destroying the nickel finish on the outside?


I have two cast iron skillets that are over 100 years old and were made by my grandfather who was a blacksmith. In all, I have 9 skillets, two biscuit pans, two loaf pans, a Dutch oven and a chicken fryer. I love my cast iron.


I recently tried to season my skillet. I was taught by my mother to use lard, and had always done it her way. Then, I read that vegetable oil worked as well. When my skillet cooled, it had a baked-on mess. I have tried to get the stick off it, but nothing seems to work. Do you have any ideas for me. I miss my skillet.


I agree with everything except the use of soap or dish detergent. Water, salt, and oils are the only things that ever touch my skillets. All soaps, even 7th Generation and other pure types leave a film on the pans. Salt is a natural purifier which leaves no residue. After the water rinse, if you must use water for stuck on bits, toss in a heaping tsp of coarse salt and rub that around the pan with a piece of cloth (dish towel scraps, cotton rag etc). You can use salt and a chain mail scrubber, rather than water, as well. The salt will remove particles and absorb excess oil. Wipe that out with your cloth, lightly oil your pan and pop it back in a hot oven for 30 mins or so. You can wipe the exterior of the pan lightly with any surplus oil on your cloth. Both the interior and exterior should always be free of food build up. When your rags get too oily or dirty, compost them.


These buttery skillet garlic pull-apart rolls are a major crowd-pleaser. They're easiest to bake in a lidded charcoal or gas grill, but I have made them in a covered skillet over a fire pit. Just be sure to keep




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